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  • Optimum Relaxer

     

    While it is quit *possible* that this was really, honestly...

    This is not true. It is not simply balancing the ph it is stopping a reaction. These are two different things altogether.

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    Her story is truly sad. I hope that she wins her case and that people will take heed to her story.

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    Her story is truly sad. I hope that she wins her case and that people will take heed to her story.

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    I agree. I agree entirely. I think it is in...

    Sorry to say but this remark shows just how misinformed even we are. Go to any lab, school I don't care and ask about sodium hydroxide. Put it on your shoes (I'd recommend an old shoe) and wash it off. Take a look the next day.

    This stuff should not be messed with.

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    I remember using Optimum relaxer.
    That s*** got your hair cat-fur straight!!!!!

    Let us all pour out some MD 20/20, uh.........I mean some olive oil for this sista's hairs........ R.I.P.

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    :Angry_boese008:

    Oh, my!! Before I knew about the "lye", regardless whatever it took.......burning, scabbed, oosing puss scalp, I wanted it skrate - no matter what! So, yes there will be very few cream crack heads who will stop the lye!! While they will feel sorry and ooh and ah.......off to get their fix

    It's a sad shame about what happened to Isabella. That's awful! I hope she wins big. Then perhaps, (unfortunately as a result of her pain), these companies will be exposed. The TRUTH always prevails!!!!!!

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    I feel like there is a certain disconnect in some of the opinions here... To use napsnap's post as an example (sorry, just because it's the most recent) you say:

    "regardless whatever it took......burning, scabbed, oosing puss scalp, I wanted it skrate - no matter what!"

    and then

    "I hope she wins big. Then perhaps, (unfortunately as a result of her pain), these companies will be exposed."

    But then you say "there will be very few cream crack heads who will stop the lye!!"

    Sounds like they are already exposed, but what good is it doing? People may or may not know the science behind how the relaxer works, but they know their (or someone else's) scalps are burning, scabbed and oozing and they don't care enough to stop relaxing. How is it Optimum's fault if this woman knew about the burning and scabbing but didn't care?

    ...Now if it was a defective batch, it would be another story (IMO).

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    I agree. I agree entirely. I think it is in...

    In medicine, there is a wide range of what’s considered normal. Just because it may have taken 30 minutes for one woman to suffer extreme scalp burns and hair loss, doesn’t mean another woman won’t experience the same damage in only four. My SO's father regularly treats patients who present with severe scalp burns from minimal exposure. My SO is a dermatology resident and he sees this all the time, too.

    Sodium hydroxide relaxers typically have a pH of between 12-14 making them extremely alkaline and dangerous. Simply rinsing the relaxer is not enough because sodium hydroxide is classified as a strong base. This means it’s water-soluble and disassociates completely in water, resulting in a basic solution. In fact, rinsing only with water could potentially cause greater damage because in solution, the sodium hydroxide would have greater access to the hair, scalp and neck. That is why a hydrophobic scalp protectant like petrolatum is imperative because it prevents sodium hydroxide from reaching the skin.

    Neutralizers are absolutely necessary for a successful relaxer application and industry protocol recognizes this. Conditioning neutralizers typically have a pH range of 3-3.5. A successful neutralization will result in the formation of salt and water, both of which are benign. If this step isn’t performed, sodium hydroxide will stay in the hair and on the scalp, resulting in further breakage and damage. Industry protocol also recommends that rinsing be limited regardless as it can cause the hair to further swell and break. It also recognizes that relaxers de-fat the scalp. My SO attends dermatology and ethnic hair conferences all of the time and the industry is very frank in the literature that it publishes.

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    How sad I was remembering the burning feeling as...

    I agree but they also need to show the picture of the model and say "CAUTION!!! This can be you!!!

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    Quote:
    odium hydroxide relaxers typically have a pH of between 12-14 making them extremely alkaline and dangerous. Simply rinsing the relaxer is not enough because sodium hydroxide is classified as a strong base. This means it's water-soluble and disassociates completely in water, resulting in a basic solution. In fact, rinsing only with water could potentially cause greater damage because in solution, the sodium hydroxide would have greater access to the hair, scalp and neck. That is why a hydrophobic scalp protectant like petrolatum is imperative because it prevents sodium hydroxide from reaching the skin.

    found this on Wikipedia

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_hydroxide

    When sodium hydroxide reacts with water and fluids, it can become hot enough to cause fires. For this reason, it is important to have the proper type of chemical fire extinguisher on hand before working with sodium hydroxide. Store NaOH in an airtight container to prevent it from absorbing water and CO2 from the air. It can create enough heat to ignite inflammables (such as alcohols).

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    I agree but they also need to show the picture...

    Hmmm...I wonder if that would get folx to actually think about it. Or would they continue to say, "That won't happen to me" as they slather that stuff all over their thinning hairlines?

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    Sorry, but I am NOT misinformed. I have done extensive...

    What I said was that "you can rinse the relaxer from the skin to stop further burning." And the specific example I gave was that of relaxer getting on the cheek.

    I did not say neutralizing was not necessary to the relaxer application.

    I DID say you can treat your *skin* without the neutralizing shampoo (as in this case where she did not have any).

    I did not say that water neutralizes the relaxer.

    If you are giving that for informational purposes, fine, but it seems as though you responded to something I did not write.

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    ...

    That is really some sick ish!

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    Balancing the pH DOES stop the reaction.763998...

    Exactly. But relaxers don't already come ph balanced. They aren't ph balanced until after the application process. The same isn't true for other commercial body care products.

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    This discussion is getting hotter than that lady's scalp.

    pookeylou, what are you doing on that site?

    Hey, they also have the forum logo!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    You can go to home depot and get the same...

    I see your point, but companies need to be held responsible if nothing more than to make them think twice about putting crap on the market for the sake of money. I am referring to more than just hair products. Everyone in the world can't be a chemist.

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    Exactly.* But relaxers don't already come ph balanced.* They aren't...

    That's true. But there still are many other acidic products used on the body.

    I get the points people trying to make, but when people go natural, it seems like they want to single out relaxers as the ONE harmful thing applied to the body/hair that should come with more warnings or taken off the market.

    If you're really concerned about the damage, then you should be concerned about other damaging products. But it seems as though people are more concerned about getting others to go natural than to provide fair labeling/warnings about household personal care products.

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    That's true. But there still are many other acidic products...

    This is so true, Charli - So true.

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    This discussion is getting hotter than that lady's scalp. pookeylou, what...

    If I understand you correctly...goingnatural.com is Masoesa's site.

    She has many natural models pictured on there. She added my profile also.

    She post links to several places a person can go to for support in going natural, this site being one of them.

    I am working on getting loccorg.com back up and running. I did not have the energy to devote to it for a while, but this thread has re-lit a fire under me. It should be back up by Monday barring any disasters.

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    In medicine, there is a wide range of what's considered...

    Ok...all of this info was SERIOUS! But an "off topic" question for the part I bolded.

    Are doctors the only ones allowed at these "dermatology and ethnic hair conferences"?

    I suscribe to several dermatology sites, but they only allow "lay" people so far into the information. You have to be a doctor to see the real deal!

    Can you recommend some additional research?

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    ...

    But the companies DO what they law requires them to do as far as labeling and product information. I remember when I used to buy the Optimum realxer in the box it came with this HUGE fan folded sheet of paper, it resembled the package inserts that come in prescription medicines. It DETAILED proper application procedures, gloves, brushes, protecting the scalp, etc.. It had sketches and detailed instructions and information.

    Lord knows I don't know what's in that box NOW (that was a consumer Optimum perm, again, came with the neutralizing solution) and I know plenty of women buy the pro versions that are just the relaxer, nothing else.

    But the point is, if you don't want to read or learn about the products that you CHOOSE to use, you cannot lay the blame on the manufacturer. if "everyone can't be a chemist" meaning they cannot be expected to know or understand the complexities of relaxers, then-- they should not be applying them themselves. I mean what else can you say?

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    I suscribe to several dermatology sites, but they only allow...

    Pookie, I know you didn't ask me, but you can google different associations for dermatology and many of the abstracts of presentations given at conferences are online, as well as select articles. I have called the libraries of some associations and they will send you information, you know if "you are a student doing research for a project."

    Highbeam is a good website if you are serious and want to pay for the information because they archive a lot of information (just type in "hair relaxer" and see what comes up!).

    And if you start at happi (which is a trade publication for personal care products)-- you can go through their sources database to find many companies that make the components for a relaxer. These companies also have a lot of technical data in pdf files that you can download and they will also send to you.

    Also, companies that make relaxer associated products (like the conditioners and such) will have the most telling technical information becuase they talk about all the damage they are trying to combat.

    But what you have to find is information that is usually given to the trade.

    And companies that sell to the trade.

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    Pookie, I know you didn't ask me, but you can...

    Thanks for the additional tips!!!

    I used Highbeam...when it was free <_<

    Man... my nappy hair hobby is costing me a bundle!

    But...the more informed we are, the better we can take care of ourselves.

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    I am sure that if anyone on this site had...

    _headshake:
    oh you'd be surprised....

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    But the companies DO what they law requires them to do as far as labeling and product information.

    Again, not speaking of only hair care, laws are not always adequate.

    But the point is, if you don't want to read or learn about the products that you CHOOSE to use, you cannot lay the blame on the manufacturer.
    IA

    if "everyone can't be a chemist" meaning they cannot be expected to know or understand the complexities of relaxers, then-- they should not be applying them themselves. I mean what else can you say?

    That goes back to original point. Then why sell home kits?

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