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  • Nurses With Dreadlocks

     

    i'm a student nurse. when we orientated into the program, the head of the department stood up and told us what would not be accepted. i had started a brand new set of locks just the week before, after getting my acceptance letter. on her list of things not to wear were locks. her rationale: "they look dirty and unkempt. how would you feel if you were the patient and a nurse walked in looking dirty and unkempt?" (and then as if the force of nature was with her, i got stuck in a rainstorm and all my coils washed out.) and so i went home to sit and ponder what i'd do with my loose hair that would look "kempt" according to her. after much concideration, listening to my mom go on and on about how it wouldn't be so bad to go back to the crack , and a huge headache from all the puffs i had to wear to keep my fro in check, i started my locks over and it's been a month and two days so far! <---- i couldn't be happier! when i started clinicals, nobody cared about my hair, patients or otherwise. i'm glad i made the decision i did. my locks will see me through to graduation (and beyond of course), and i'm very proud of them.

    i don't have any questions to pose, just wanted to share. thanks for listening.

    **edited to add (and beyond of course) lol**

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    I'm glad you went with what was in your heart. My daughter asked me about locking her hair about 31/2 years ago. She had gone natural a few years before and swore never to return to perm. I was dead against it at the time. However I decided to investigate, since I had gone natural myself and was secretly interested in locs. The result was, I repented of my attitude, admited my ignorance, learned everything I could about locs and started my own. She was unable to start hers bc of the negativity she encountered (in Ghana). I became her encourager and supporter in her decision to loc. Fnally, last January I started her off with twists, and the tables have turned! All the naysayers want to know how she does locs and whether she can start theirs too. I'm saying all this to say when you stick to your convictions, you'll be vindicated in the end.

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    man.. ppl kill me. I think ill get banned if i type [in this forum]what i would have said to her .

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    I saw two black women in the hospital I volunteer at with dreads. I've been complimented on in regards to mine, and they were all 'unkempt'. The roots were undone and puffy. So... that makes three sets of dreads. The other women's locks were long and mature, though, and mine are like 6-7 months in.

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    SEE, TO ME UNKEMPT MEANS DIRTY & NASTY... PUFFY ROOTS DO NOT MEAN UNKEMPT , IT JUST MEANS UN-TWSITED/MANICURED.

    MY THYK, PUFFY, UNTWISTED ROOTS ARE VERY WELL KEPT ACTUALLY, SO THAT ASSUMPTION & TERM JUST PI$$ES ME OFF.

    ( NOT DIRECTED THE SISTER ABOVE.. GOTTA PUT DISCLAIMERS OUT ARND THIS PIECE )

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    when I sprained my ankle the nurse who helped to wrap it had locs. She was asking me where I got mine done we actually had a nice conversation...I'm not shocked by the ignorance of others but luckily there are nurses out there who wear locs.

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    I understand what you're saying msjaim2, that's why I had them in quotes.

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    I am a nurse with loc and mine are about 4-5 weeks in. I have short comb curls and even when mine are looking crazy I get complements from my co workers. I am about to move to a new unit next week and I am planning on just looking nuts while I am there so if anyone thinks anything about my hair they wont dare say it hahah. ^_^ .

    Ignorance is a horrible thing. I will not under any circumstances cut my hair. Trust me I am a single parent and need my job but there are somethings I will not tolerate..
    I am glad that you kept your hair the way you wanted.

    Just a word of advice, when you become a nurse admin will try you any way they can. Stand your ground..This is just the beginning.

    Lots of luck
    D-

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    My sister has been a nurse for 15 years or so. She's had locks the past 4 or 5 years and has never had a problem getting or keeping a job because of her hair. She's moved around and that's why she's changed jobs. Different cities in three different states and there's never been an issue with her hair.

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    :Angry:

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    I am a nurse and have been one for going on 2 years... this time i have a BIG afro..and in all of the settings that i have worked in, nobody (not even my bosses) have had a problem with my hair. I am getting ready to start locing soon and I dont think there is any problem!!!!

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    Interesting... my first thought was ras tai is a doctor and he post here regularly and has locks to the middle of his back.

    Funny... I guess it depends on where you live because where I am from the nappies and loc'd that I see are almost all nurses, doctors or working in the medical field... the second group were in tech.

    These were two fields where I first saw nappy professionals on the regular... and not newbies but those who had been in the profession for YEARS and nappy or loc'd just as long judging by their appearance.

    I think at times we don't consider that professionals have their own biases and issues... wonderful teachers and bosses, even family members can have issues with nappy hair, in large part because they haven't been educated on nappy hair... especially loc'd hair.

    Don't let that stop you from doing you ~W

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    I'm not a nurse, but I graduated from PT (physical therapy) school in 1991, then went natural in 1994. I 've been locking for 13 months now, and my hair has never been an issue as far as career goes. I really think that, with the shortages in healthcare personnel (nursing, physical/occupational/speech/respiratory therapists, MD's, physician assistants) companies are really just glad to have a competent candidate. It's refreshing to think that one could be hired based on credentials, not appearance .

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    My mother is a nurse. She's RASTAFARIAN. She's been a nurse for more than 20 years and has had her dreads for about 25 years. She KEEPS them covered. She has SEVERAL white head wraps. I've never seen my mother go to work w/o her head covered. She doesn't do it for anyone but herself.
    However, if I were in nursing and had dreads, I would cover them up just like my mom. And for different reasons. You don't know who you're dealing with. I think having your dreads covered puts forth a neater appearance. Even if I worked in hospital administration I would cover my head. Probably not for the interview, but going forward. Running around all day...helping people....I probably would want to cover up my locs.

    It's a shame that someone can say something like that. But who knows what they've dealt with in the past. Some locs do look dirty and unruly.

    But hold up....this person told you that you aren't allowed to have locs....and you locked your hair again?
    Have you had a side conversation with this person, because you just blatently did something that was against the rules.

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    I know a neonatalogist, a nurse practitioner, and an occupational nurse with locs. Of course I know several PTs, OTs, and STs with locs and twists. All hair, straight or curly, natural or rlaxed, should be under control while engaged in patient care. Nothing about our personal appearance should interfere with performing our jobs. I used to use sign language at work. A student said my long red nails (I was in my 20s) were confusing. So I cut them.

    When you get your Ph.D in Nursing and become head of the nursing department at the school, you'll set them all straight!

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    However, if I were in nursing and had dreads, I...

    those were her (director) personal wishes and opinions. i checked our handbook and the wearing of locks or any other hair style is nowhere mentioned. it just said that our appearance must be neat and there are some strict stipulations on jewelry and how our uniform must be worn, but that's it. i intend to keep them neat, until the summer that is! :P oh, and as for your second question, i have found that she's actually intrigued by them. even when i had my puff she would ask all kinds of questions about my hair. there's another lady who has started her locks as well and she hasn't said anything negative about them yet. she just looks at them like she's wondering, lol. there's a lady in a senior level class with locks to her brastrap. as far as i know i haven't broken any rules though.

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    ^_^ I thinks it's funny that this topic was brought up. I'm a new nursing grad (just took the nclex 2day) and have had locs for about 6-9 months. (I've been natural for 3 years). When I first started to school I would alternate between the twists, twist out, and puffs. Well one day when I was performing a procedure in the classroom lab the instructor commented on my hair (it was in a twistout). She said "I don't like your hair like that, it looks really pretty the other way you wear it." She was talking about the twists. I didn't get offended by her comment; because actually I preferred my hair twisted. The reason I'd taken the twist down was because I thought maybe she/the school/the hospital would try to raise an issue about my twists which was why I did the twist out. I couldn't have been more wrong. In every facility that I've done a rotation in, the patients, residents, nurses, other staff have not raised a stink about my hair; they have absolutely loved it. I get the occasional sneer and the "what is she trying to prove?" looks from members of my own race but seldom from non-blacks.
    BTW, at Memorial Medical Center in Savannah, there are quite a few nurses with locs and they are beautiful.

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    i don't have any questions to pose, just wanted to...

    Well i would like to say I'm a RN Nurse Recruiter and in the firm that i work for we do not ask nurses for the grooming of their hair. We look for grad nurses with a degree, experience nurses. Time are changing life are moving on I love the song that India Aire and Akon sing I am not my hair. we are human being and people need to start respecting us for who we are. I have been in nursing for 30yrs and my hair have been from every degree it could go and now I'm a woman of age who luv my locks and would not trade them for anything.

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    very interesting topic since I will be starting nursing school in another year. I was wondering abouth that!!

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    i'm a student nurse. when we orientated into the program, the head of the department stood up and told us what would not be accepted. i had started a brand new set of locks just the week before, after getting my acceptance letter. on her list of things not to wear were locks. her rationale: "they look dirty and unkempt. how would you feel if you were the patient and a nurse walked in looking dirty and unkempt?" (and then as if the force of nature was with her, i got stuck in a rainstorm and all my coils washed out.) and so i went home to sit and ponder what i'd do with my loose hair that would look "kempt" according to her. after much concideration, listening to my mom go on and on about how it wouldn't be so bad to go back to the crack , and a huge headache from all the puffs i had to wear to keep my fro in check, i started my locks over and it's been a month and two days so far! <---- i couldn't be happier! when i started clinicals, nobody cared about my hair, patients or otherwise. i'm glad i made the decision i did. my locks will see me through to graduation (and beyond of course), and i'm very proud of them.

    i don't have any questions to pose, just wanted to share. thanks for listening.

    **edited to add (and beyond of course) lol**

    I am a registered nurse and I am here to tell you when apply for a job they could care less what your hair looks like! It is obvious that there are quite a few very ignorant people who know nothing about locks and assume what they see or hear! I congradulate you for sticking it out! I work as a traveler and never had any ill will towards my hair if any it was the aroma my hair carries because I use cloves and other eo's Your locks will grow as you will in your nursing career!

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    ...

    Me too!! I'll definitely be brushing up on my
    critical thinking skills during this year-long wait.

    My locs are just starting to look like sumthin!
    I have no intentions of cutting them.

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    I'm a nurse, and i've been loced for 2.5 yrs.

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    I'm a nursing student considering locing my fro and no one seems to have aproblem with it. When I think my twist look their absolute worst. i get the most compliments. I also work as a patient care assistant at a hospital and a fair number of nappies and lockers work there. I'm glad you stayed true to yourself and I'm sure your locs will be amazing. Happy growing!

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    I am a nurse in an ICU and do independent contracting outside of the hospital setting. Although I have not made the move yet to dreads (hopefully I will soon), I wear a lot of natural styles including braids and twists. I would be lieing if I said my hair isn't an issue at work, but it is in a positive way. I noticed that it seems to serve as a distraction, people are truly fascinated with my hair - they want to touch it, talk about it, ask for advice. Our hair is our crown & our glory!

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    I too am a student nurse going into my last semester ( pt care mgt and practicum). When I started my program I was relaxed and decided to cut my hair in the beginging of my second semester. I wore all kind of crazy styles to lecture but always pulled my hair back in a puff for clinicals. At the end of my second semester on of the leaders of the class pulled me to the side complimented my shoes and told me my hair was too wild and that the others ( other races) wouldn't understand it. I took it in stride and at first I was likd of skeptical about starting locs until after I'm hired as a nurse. My supervisor on my unit met me with natural hair but when I came into work one day with a quick weave went on and on about how she liked my hair straight . Again this put me in a position of what do I do follow my heart or conform just for a little bit until Im in the game completely... Im leaning towards following my heart..
    with that being said

    I visited your fotki and think that your locs are far from looking unkempt and so on as they refer... They are really pretty and I think if it doesn't interfere with the care you providing for your patient as in compassion and proper care then follow your heart.....Bottom line it looks good and I should be following your footsteps shortly

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    When I saw this topic I was like "wow, that's going to be me one day" I'm a freshman in college and my major is nursing and although I am still about another year and some from upper division, I haven't started my locs yet but when I do, my locs should be fully installed by then. I agree with kinkylicious that locs could serve as a good distraction to patients, like a patient might say "Where's the nurse with the dreadlocs?? I liked her." silly, I know, but you never know LOL.I'm so excited about my journey!!

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    "Where's the nurse with the dreadlocks?" I get that a lot at my office; as a matter of fact, some patients refer to me as the one with the dreadlocks or the one with the pretty/neat/different hair. There's no doubt in anyone's mind who they're talking about and I love it.

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