• Search
  • Register
  • Log in
  • Hair Care Information » General Forum
  • Jalapeno Peppers In The Hair?

     

    I was just taking to a friend of mine over the phone. She has been natural on and off for as long as I known her (when I was a small child). She is about 35, 10 years older than I. She has 3 children. All of them are natural.

    She was doing her usual complaining to me about the oldest daughters (age 7) hair. (She has natural strawberry blond hair with platinum highlights. Her hair is 4 b and down her back.) She always tell me its hard to comb etc. I try to give her some pointers that would make it easier to do her hair but she is just lazy.

    Now she is also against relaxers as I am. But she was telling me that a friend told her that jalapeno peppers would help "naturally" straighten the hair (!) and that she is planning on doing that to her daughters hair. She is planning on taking a dozen peppers, put them in a blender, mix with something else (dont remember what) and apply it to her hair like a relaxer. I promptly told her that not only that idea is just plain dumb, but it is dangerus. It WILL burn her skin like hell and might get into her eyes. She can have a bad skin reaction to that etc. ops:

    She said she will be careful then she had to get off the phone.

    I feel so helpless now. I dont know what to do. I mean, if she wants to do that to her OWN head thats fine. But I cant let her do that to a helpless child! I dont live near her so I cant go to her place. What should I do?

    #
    Member
     

    I really don't think that there's anything more that you can do. You've already spoken to her; but at the end of the day she's just gonna do whatever she wants to.
    I feel sorry for her child.

    #
    Member
     
     

    I know she's against relaxers. Maybe you can find a dermatologist to give her a bonafide opinion. I would say let her talk to a hairdresser, but I don't want the hairdresser to persuade the mom to perm.

    #
    Member
     

    :-P

    I'm speechless...

    I can't believe she is really thinking about putting that in her hair. All I can do is shake my head. You've done all you can do, maybe she will change her mind because of something you said.

    #
    Member
     

    Whaaaa.....?

    Peppers?

    #
    Member
     

    That is unbelievable since she is so set on doing it tell her to try it on her head first. :-? I seriously doubt she would put it in her childs hair after that. That will burn her scalp, poor child.

    #
    Member
     

    Prayer for her, boy do people come up with anything to straighten hair

    #
    Member
     

    I'm assumming the pepper concoction would work like the infamous milk 'n lime juice naturalxer... Maybe you can change her mind by explaining how such mixtures work and and tell her about the damage and other unintended consequences even those with loose waves and curl have suffered after using such stuff. They talk a lot about this at naturallycurly.com

    #
    Member
     

    first it was Tide and now its peppers.....whatever.....

    #
    Member
     

    Lime? Milk? Tide? and now peppers. I did talk to my friend about this. She will try it on her head first before messing around with the kid's head.

    #
    Member
     

    Thank goodness she's at least going to try it out on her own head first -- although it's just a bad idea in general and I hope she doesn't burn herself.

    There's a reason why many people wear gloves when they're chopping peppers: because there's some serious heat there. If peppers can burn your hands, and that's well documented, just imagine what they could do to the sensitive skin on your scalp. Sheesh, my head hurts just thinking about it!

    #
    Member
     

    I feel for her daughter, boy oh boy.

    #
    Member
     

    She will have a relaxer in the next couple of years, I betcha, if not sooner. Tell you friend to do her hair first to see what happens. If that doesn't change her mind then she needs some help. :-P

    #
    Member
     

    That's interesting I was looking at one of the hair regrowth products figuring I can make the products myself...cheap I know...
    and in one of them they had peppers
    It was not THE MAIN INGREDIENT but I did a little research and found that peppers stimulate the scalp
    OUCH!! I bet they DO!
    I feel sorry for that women's kids, I'll shed a tear for them

    #
    Member
     

    I have to laugh! your friend need some help. that stuff is going to burn that baby up. what the hell is wrong with her? I feel sorry for that little 7year old girl. I think she needs to seek professional help you have done enough....

    #
    Member
     

    everytime I see this thread popup it makes me want to cook up something spicy... I hope your friend doesn't put pepper on her child's head... she may need intervention

    #
    Member
     

    #
    Member
     

    I'm assumming the pepper concoction would work like the...

    I'm interested in knowing what damage it causes. Is there any way that you could link me to the place that you read that at naturally? Or is it just in various places in the discussion boards?

    #
    Member
     

    bump

    #
    Member
     

    ...

    For REAL!!!!

    #
    Member
     

    Found some interesting info on jalepeno peppers. Hopefully you can get this to her before she burns herself or her child:

    Chili Peppers

    Perhaps the chief misconception about chili peppers is their red-hot reputation. Many are fiery hot, but many others are sweet, mild, or richly flavored. Their hotness is concentrated in the interior veins or ribs near the seed heart, not in the seeds as is commonly believed (the seeds taste extra hot because they are in close contact with the hot veins). If, when the pepper is cut open, the veins have a yellowish orange color in that area, it usually indicates the pepper will be a potent one.
    That the burning sensation that makes chile peppers so appealing to culinary thrill-seekers comes from capsaicin or more accurately a collection of compounds called capsaicinoids. These develop in the placenta or cross-ribs of the fruit, which is why that part of the chili pepper is the hottest. A single dominant gene transmits capsaicinoids. Bell peppers are just like jalapeno peppers and Serrano peppers but bell peppers taste bland instead of pungent because they lack that gene.

    In 1912, a pharmacist named Scoville came up with a heat index for measuring the âœheat❠in a chili product, or scoring capsaicinoid content. This index was called the Scoville Units and is still used today. A more modern version used by many chile writers is called âœthe Official Chile Pepper Heat Scale❠with a rating of zero to ten. Bell peppers rate a zero because they contain no capsaicinoid. At a 5 rating: jalapeno peppersâ¦at a 6 rating serrano peppers⦠at a 8 rating cayenne peppers and tabasco peppers⦠and at a 9 rating chalet pin peppers and Thai hot peppers.

    The spelling of the word "chili" is used here as it is used in Mexico. Because American spice companies label their ground chili blends "chili" you will encounter that spelling in recipes using the purchased ground spice.

    More than 140 varieties of chilies peppers are grown in Mexico alone. Those that follow are most popular in the United States and used in most Mexican cooking recipes.

    Scoville Units Names
    0 Bell Sweet Italian
    100 - 500 Peperoncini Cherry
    500 - 1,000 New Mexico
    1,000 - 1,500 Pasilla Poblano Ancho
    1,500 - 2,500 Rocotillo
    2,500 - 5,000 Jalapeno Chipotle Guajillo
    5,000 - 10,000 Yellow Wax
    10,000 - 23,000 Serrano
    325,000 and up Habanero

    Descriptions

    Bell peppers Probably the most familiar pepper in the United States, the green and red bell peppers are squarish and fist-size. Green peppers turn red in the fall, becoming sweeter and milder, yet retaining their crisp, firm texture.
    Ancho peppers This chili looks and tastes very much like ordinary bell pepper but can be considerably more peppery at times. Tapered rather than square, it is firmer, less crisp, more waxy-looking. It turns a bright red and sweetens up in the fall. When dry, it assumes a flat, round shape and wrinkles up like a prune.
    California green chilies (Anaheim) Fresh, these peppers are 5 to 8 inches long, 1 1/2 to 2 inches wide, tapering to a point, usually a bright, shiny green. The flavor ranges from mild and sweet to moderate hot. To use fresh peppers, peel the skin from the chilies. When using fresh or canned, taste for hotness - they can vary greatly from pepper to pepper.
    Chilaca Chiles Look and taste much like the guajillo and guayon chiles.
    Chile de Arbol Also known as the "Cola de Rata". Often dried, toasted, used to decorate Mexican dishes.
    Chipotle Chiles Made from jalapenos that have been dried and smoked. Sold both dried and canned in adobo, or a rich smoky dark reddids-brown sauce.
    Fresno chili peppers Bright green, changing to orange and red when fully matured. Fresno chilies have a conical shape - about 2 inches long and 1 inch in diameter at the stem end. They are often just labeled "hot chili peppers" when canned or bottled.
    Guajillo Chiles Smooth-skinne, brick or cranberry red chiles, a bit spicier than anchos and not as sweet. Because of their tangy brightness, they are often powdered over fruit or vegetables or added to stews and soups.
    Jalapeno chili peppers These peppers have thicker flesh, darker green color, and more cylindrical shape than Fresno chilies; however, the heat level of the two varieties is about the same - HOT! Canned and bottled peppers are sometimes labeled "hot peppers" with jalapeno as a subtitle. They are always available in sauce form as salsa jalapena, and pickled.
    Mulato Chiles Mollyp brown, longer and more tapered than the ancho, more pungent also. Often replaces the ancho in recipes.
    Pasilla peppers The true pasilla pepper is a long, thin pepper 7 to 12 inches long by 1 inch in diameter. Pasillas turn from dark green to dark brown as they mature.
    Pequin Chiles Tiny, dried red bullets of fiery heat, adding a unique flavor to many dishes. Crumble the dried pod and add.
    Pimentos These heart-shaped chilies are purchased canned in the United States. The flesh is softer and a little sweeter than the common red bell pepper.
    Poblano Chiles Dark green, about the size of a bell pepper but tapered at one end, can be mild or hot. Often used in "Chile Rellenos"
    Serrano Chiles A small 1 à‚½â fresh HOT pepper. The smaller they are, the more kick they have. Most often used in Pico de Gallo. Dynamite -hot is an understatement for these tiny 1-inch peppers. When new on the vine, they are rich, waxy green, changing to orange and red as they mature. They also sold canned, pickled, or packed in oil. A great source of vitamin C.
    Small, whole, red dried hot chilie peppers. Labeled this way on the supermarket spice shelves, many small, tapered chilies about 1 to 2 inches long are sold dried, but there is no one varietal name that applies to all of them.
    Yellow Chile peppers. Many short conical-shaped yellow peppers with a waxy sheen go by this name-Santa Fe grande, caribe, banana pepper, Hungarian, Armenian way, floral gem, and gold spike. Probably most familiar are the canned pickled wax peppers. Their flavor ranges from medium-hot to hot.
    Habanero peppers To date these are the Hottest chili peppers know to man, HOT - HOT - HOT. Use extreme caution when using. Marble-shaped chili peppers, ranges in color from unripe green to full ripe red.

    DID YOU KNOW.....

    CAPSAICIN (Zostrix), a topical nonprescription cream, made from the seeds of hot chili peppers, is used to treat skin hypersensitivity resulting from "shingles" (Herpes Zoster). It is the only medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia. (Article originally published in the Mayo Clinic Health Letter, Nov. 1997)

    Use Caution In Handling And Storing Chile Peppers

    When using fresh or dried chili peppers, wear gloves to protect your hands because the oils, capsaicin*, in the peppers can cause severe burns. Don't touch your face or eyes. If chilies do come in contact with your bare hands, wash thoroughly with soapy water. If burning persists, soak hands in a bowl of milk. When grinding dried chilies, beware of the chili dust in the air, which will irritate eyes and throats.

    * Remedies for eating a pepper that is too hot for you:
    Drink milk, rinsing the mouth with it while swallowing, ice cream or yogurt. Eat rice or bread which will absorb the capsaicin. Drink tomato juice or eat a fresh lime or lemon ( the acid will counter act the alkalinity of the capsaicin). Do not drink water- capsaicin which is an oil, will not mix with water but instead, will distribute to more parts of the mouth.

    *Capsaicin is the heat factor in chilies that is used medically to produce deep-heating rubs for treating sports injuries and arthritic therapies.

    This was from: http://tm.wc.ask.com/r?t=c&s=a1&id=30780&s...eppersfacts.htm

    #
    Member
     

    Pookeylou, thanks for all the info! I will show it to her.

    fftopic BTY, I have tried Habanero peppers and that is NOTHING to play around with!

    #
    Member
     

    peppers?hmmm.... . Let me know if it works.

    #
    Member
     

    peppers?hmmm.... . Let me know if it works. ...

    Pookie...(I have never addressed another "Pookie" before :-) )

    Just to be clear...

    Carlasher is trying to STOP someone from doing this crazy concoction before she chemically burns her child or blinds herself.

    I REPEAT...we are not advocating the use of peppers or any chemical to straighten the hair. </span>

    I copied that information for her to show how toxic and damaging the peppers can be so that she could use that to help her friend see what danger she is about to get herself in.

    I just wanted to make that point clear. I could not tell from your smilies if you thought we were attempting to participate in such a assinine treatment.

    :-)

    #
    Member
     

    peppers?hmmm.... . Let me know if it works. ...

    Pookie...(I have never addressed another "Pookie" before :-) )

    Just to be clear...

    Carlasher is trying to STOP someone from doing this crazy concoction before she chemically burns her child or blinds herself.

    I REPEAT...we are not advocating the use of peppers or any chemical to straighten the hair. </span>

    I copied that information for her to show how toxic and damaging the peppers can be so that she could use that to help her friend see what danger she is about to get herself in.

    I just wanted to make that point clear. I could not tell from your smilies if you thought we were attempting to participate in such a assinine treatment.

    :-)

    Oh Gosh no! I hope we don't get a bandwagon of hot pepper straighteners. The emergency department would be busy treating second degree burns! LOL!

    #
    Member
     

    My main concern is that it not get into the child's eyes. Most cooks use latex gloves to protect any cuts on their hands and to avoid getting any residue on their fingers because if it gets in their eyes WATCH OUT.

    So...how are you going to put 10 blended peppers into a 7 year olds hair and not get it into her eyes? She's probably gonna be scared, restless etc.

    My second concern is what the whole process would do to her psyche. I can just see her at 27. "I remember the time my mother put jalapeno peppers in my hair cause she wanted it to be straight. ....."

    #
    Member
     

    Quick, what's the phone number for the local DSS?!?!

    #
    Member
     

    I am still amazed that people are talking about a milk and lime natural relaxer. Can't they read? There was a post to a site that mentioned spraying milk (ALL BY ITSELF) on the hair. Then another site was referred to re: COCONUT MILK AND LIME along with how to make it. Others were also amazed that some didn't read it as it was written, did all kinds of weird mixing and matching with it, and then claimed that their hair was DAMAGED BY MILK!!! . My point is that misinformation was being passed on; people continued to pass that misinformation on, and someone told their friend who told their friend....simply amazing. When some were told to go back and read the original post and see what it clearly stated, and then go and read the sites that were referred to....they too were amazed that they had got it all mixed up!!!! I for one do not care to post or refer people to anything because they often mix it up or mess it up and ...but then you can go back and check it out for yourselves how some messed up.

    #
    Member
     

    Ya'll better stop talking about those peppers! next thing you know somebody on some site will be saying that they are advocatin' using peppers, milk and lime to straighten hair over here ...lollollol

    #
    Member
     

    Did yall know that horse dung mixed with apple cider vinegar and coca cola is a natural relaxer?

    This pepper thing gives new meaning to forum's terms for relaxers: FIRE CREAM or CREME de FLAME.

    I am still amazed at what risks we will take for straight hair. Still amazed.

    ~Molly~

    #
    Member
     
    12
    RSS feed for this topic  

    Reply »

    You must log in to post.

  • Tags
  •   No tags yet.
     
    Hair Care Information. Sitemap