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  • Haitian Loc'ers?

     

    ^^ Basically. You could be how old but Haitian mummy's are like---you're still a "ti moun" no matter how old you grow. I remember to us...she's like "I'm living with a bunch of 'grans moun'" But when talking to family---"ou konnay ti moun yo la..." ~sigh~ Anyway, the family thing is right. My mum is like Gonaive? What's the last name? Then she's like we're Ti-Riviere/St. Marc people. Any other people from that area of home.

    It wasn't until I decided to get locs did my mum say anything. I always give tend to give her fair warning (a few months in advance) before I do anything. Because I've come to realize my mum needs stuff to marinate a bit before she can "tolerate" an new idea. After a few weeks, normally the first month she'll bring the conversation up again with me and we can talk about it like reasonable people. Otherwise it leads to a yelling match and no one is happy.

    As far as natural hair---she let us do our own hair since very young. She got tired of doing our hair. ^_^ M

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    i went on a cruise to haiti and jamaica and the thing i wanted to bring back most was a hat for my locks. we stopped in haiti first so i asked one of the guys at one of the local shops where i could by a dread hat. maaaaaaan, that brotha looked at me like i said something bad about his momma. he looked at me and my hair and said to me coldly "haitian don't dread, brudda". he looked at me like i was doo doo on his shoe. i just walked away feeling like "dang, oh well". i ended up getting one hand made when we landed in Jamaica.

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    ^^^

    That's something my dad would say to you BiggRapp

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    I looove this thread and I am not even Haitian au plaisir de vous lire

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    "Bon Dyie, oh" (=OMG) is what I hear whenever my mom sees my hair. The last time she saw me she kept asking me what I was going to do with all of that hair and even offered to pay for me to get it permed and maintained... She hates it! My dad doesn't care as long as it makes me happy but my mom, sis and FMIL won't give me a break.
    My FMIL calls my locs cordailles, which can roughly be translated into "ropes"... Just last week she asked me if I would dare walking down the aisle with my cordailles, telling me how I should do my hair curly and lague sous dos-m (laying over my back) like her on her wedding day.
    I know I will be criticized for it for years to come, but hey, can't change their 40+ year old mentality, lol. I can already hear it "kade eta tete ti fille-a, li refuse al met permanente pou li ta fe bel ti coupe jou mariage-li" = look at how ugly the girl's hair is and she refused to relax it and make it pretty on her own wedding day. Good times!!

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    You all are too funny!! I can't stop laughing out loud!! Oh how I can so relate as a newbie locer with traditional Haitian parents. My dad thinks it's great, mom preferred me loose. When I was loose and my hair was growing bigger, dad didn't like the "out" styles. Locs were something I always admired. Lesson; we will and can never please anyone. Only seek to please God. I myself think locs are beautiful and signify a strong crown of glory. Mom may come around when she sees my 1-2 year progress/length ..still, I have to live my life. I have come to the conclusion that people all around are just limited to the versatility and beauty that is locs. I'm looking forward to my journey and sharing it with you all.

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    Came back in here to laugh some more and shake my head. You didn't disappoint. It is what it is.

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    i think locs are more accepted in jamaica and haiti - i am happy times are changing.

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    My mom is Haitian and my father is Ghanaian so I had problems from the start....and I'm a male....lol

    my relatives pretty much accepted it... my dad he seems to have a problem with my locs....

    my locs are 5 yrs old....

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    both parents are Haitian and neither liked when i chopped off all my hair or started locing originally. but now that i have a bit of length, my mom thinks it looks beautiful and is considering one day locing. never thought i'd see that day though. my dad still doesn't like it too much but i figured i'm grown now and can do whatever i want.
    i say live your life, as much as we love our parents you can't do everything just to please them.

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    I'm Haitian and when I got my BC I was living at home. First thing I did was walk to my moms room and let her feel my texture...she loved it immediately ^_^ Growing up my mom has come home with all kinds of styles from finger waves to a short do w/ a texturizer. Just a few wks ago she told me she was going back to natural, went to my barber, and now she's rocking her BC & lovin' it My dad on the other hand, wasn't a huge fan of my baby locs,but he'll get over it once they get longer lol

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    Haitian-American to be exact ^_~

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    bump** my cousin has been loced for 20 yrs and nobody talks about him, but they wanna get on me O_o

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    my hubby is Ayisien woot (represent) lol. I'm trying to get him to loc (have been for the past year or so), but he's stalling. Locs on men are secsay!

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    wats this haitian jamaican hostility???.... im jamaican and i have a lot of haitian friends..... one of my friend's mom's is haitian and has some problem wit jamaicans but i just thought it was cuz shes crazy lol

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    the hostility runs deep. to be honest, it was always the jamaicans back in my day making fun of me for being haitian. they would call me a haitian booty scratcher (dont everyone scratch their booty once in a while?). i think its language envy and differences in values. they didn't like my mannerisms, the ribbons in my hair that every haitian girl was rocking back in the day, my values, the way i dress - just everything! we all came from the same diaspora and we need to focus on our similarities and not our differences!

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    and most of the time when my family mix with other races/nationalities its jamaican!!!

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    I'm American, but I always admired Haiti for being the first country to gain independence from Europe. My loctitian is Haitian and she does a mean set of braids! Thank God for the Jamaicans, who showed us all how to rock the locks.

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    Went to Haiti for a week in June and boy did I get a lot of stares!!! Haitians are so weird when it comes to locs its ridiculous. Would of thought I was an alien or something with the amount of stares and questions I got.
    And yes back in the day and still now there is a love/hate relationship with jamaicans and haitians. Why? Who knows. But haitians and jamaicans sure do love to get together lol

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    The Haitian/Jamaican divide is of political origins from my understanding. According to Sharon E. Clarke ("Refugee Rights in the Caribbean: A study of Haitians in Jamaica") this discord can be traced back to the early 1990's when coups in Haiti caused Haitian to move to Jamaica in greater numbers.

    Haitians tend to be marginalized everywhere But that's a topic for another thread. This thread is about love and kinship lol.

    L'union fait la force

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    ^^ well said nickib, well said. matta fact i should post a thread on that!

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    lol its crazy tho cuz if u step back and look.... jamaicans and haitians are real similar

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    The Haitian/Jamaican divide is of political origins from my understanding....

    Interesting you should say that. My mother said it goes deeper than that. 90s is way to early. From my mother's statement this goes back to the 60s/70s. My mother was born in Haiti during the baby boomers era in America, 1946. I asked her what she knew about how it started. And she said based on her understanding it started when there was a shooting spree in Jamaica at a school. There happened to be a lot of Haitian students studying there---a few friends of the family (my mum was a boarding school brat---while growing up and she was supposed to go to this school in Jamaica). Anyway several Haitian students were killed in that shooting. She never verified if it was a hate killing or something else.

    However, she said that's what really started the rift. There was a huge Jamaican backlash in Haiti when the news made it's way back to Haiti. Before that Haiti really cared a great deal about all the formerly slave nations in the Caribbean. Even Dessaline wrote books about how he wanted to free all slaves in the Caribbean from imperial power and this was fueled a good deal by Boukman (who was not Jamaican but was in Jamaica before he was shipped over to Haiti (he was a minor player in the Haitian revolution)).

    I checked on line for information on this shooting, but I couldn't find anything. But I don't doubt it happened since family friends died and this was confirmed by other family members. Not to mention I did find out there was massive violent unrest during the 60s and 70s in Jamaica at that time.
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    Some of the old wive's divides on the issue had to do with food. There's a fruit or a food of some kind that Jamaican's eat but Haitian's see it as poisonous. Some people have told me that Haitians believe Jamaican's are in cahoots with Satan because they can eat that fruit.

    This is of course nonsense. Haiti's a superstitious country no doubt. And what I speak of to be nonsense is the cahoots with Satan. I feel like telling Haitian's the Japanese might think the same because you eat blowfish---yeah don't ask; apparently my mother used to feed me blowfish all the time, it's her favorite fish.

    Anyway moving on. This fruit or vegetable (I think it's a fruit) is real. Jamaicans do eat it, but they know how to cook it. Haitian's don't eat it because they don't know how to cook it--and some Haitians do subscribe to the superstition. It didn't help that recently---early 2000's I believe, a volunteer from Jamaica came to a Haitian community and cooked the fruit/vegetable for them---he didn't teach them how to cook it though. Well he leaves, they think it's okay to eat and a good number of people in the village died.

    Another issue I remember hearing had to do with the snob/elitist/high maintenance factor. Of course this is based on stereotypes and my Jamaican friend was telling me about it. She said that she and other's normally find Haitian people to be uppity and she thinks it goes back to the fact we were the first Black country in the Caribbean to get our independence. So we come across as a bit authoritative. Honestly, I just think from my experience with Haitian classmates---it's just who they are. Some people get rubbed off the wrong way. On the flipside--there at times seems to be an association of dredlocs which many Haitians don't find aesthetically pleasing with not taking care of yourself or sloppiness and so on. I guess that doesn't compliment the high maintenance factor.

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    lol its crazy tho cuz if u step back and...

    I would agree, but they are fairly superficial when you look at it. The only thing that makes us similar is that we were originally colonized nations, are a mixed people, and are in the Caribbean.

    Other than that we are culturally different, linguistically different, our historical origins are different, food which is part of cultural is different. I'm a bit believer in relativism and I like individuality of nations and believe they are to be respected. I'm not saying that there aren't similarities. But then the same could be said about Haiti and Korea, most definitely Haiti and Dominican Republic.

    However there are clear distinctions and I like that.

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    my dad's side of the family saw my hair again and are not too about it because my older cousin whopse been locked for 20 years has it. i am however, the first female in the fam on both sides to have locs. i might be attending a family wedding..we'll see how that goes.

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    i'm jamaican and my father hates it. says i look like a rasta. smh.. he's one of those uppity jamaicans that looks down on anyone that doesnt fit into a nice little box. w/e tho. traditional west indian parents are gonna hate locs.. thats just the culture. but its your head at the end of the day. loc'ed or not, natural is healthier than a perm so let them get alopecia and cancer..

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    My aunt tries to compare to my hair to a girl that's starving in a different country she says " your hair looks like her situation"

    If I was younger, I woulda been offended but I just at the situation.

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