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  • Haitian Loc'ers?

     

    Ok so i was reading about this in another thread and could def. relate! i recently loced my hair and my parents went berserk. there are two other men in my family who are loc'ed but they get overlooked. i hear the discourse about not getting a job, looking like a jamaican, and looking crazy! the jamaican thing traces back the haitian vs. jamaican hostility. please sure your thoughts and support!!!

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    You were reading about what? My parents aren't Haitian, but they weren't fans of me loc'ing and I've been out of their house for YEARS.

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    No trouble with my family on either side regarding my locs.

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    karibana, is your family traditional? i see this with a lot of traditional haitians.

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    ^^^Well they can be traditional but at the same time they are also very open, especially on my mom's side. Me cutting off my hair was the biggest issue with my mom, I don't remember anything from them when I locked. My dad basically said that it was my head so he didn't really care or at least, he didn't say anything. Quite a few of my aunts and cousins on his side are natural, some are locked.

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    I went through more negatively with my parent when I decided to go natural then I did on getting sisterlocks. Both my parent are Haitian and they straight out told me that my hair being natural was not professional at all. When I got sisterlocks, they were more willing to accept it. I guess the concept of sisterlocks was more presentable to them then natural? Still lost on that one .They usually refer to people that have dreadlock as "vakabon" meaning that person is either a gangster or thug.

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    I'm haitian AND married to a Jamaican man, lol.

    I will be locing this summer and If I don't know what to expect, but hey, I am a married woman and they adore hubby. We shall see, lol.

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    lol the vagabond comment. i definitely get that too! the thing about sisterlocks is that i think its more accepted than traditional dreadlocks because it resembles box braids. box braids is more accepted by most cultures

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    i'm haitian and my mom didnt like me going natural and she sure as hell doesnt like that i am locked. To mke matters worse my brother started locking his hair this summer so no i am influencing him. Everytime i jokingly ask my lil sis when is she going to loc or my mom, my mom is like she better not and as for her self "mwen mem fe bagai sa? Jamais!'' lol. My moms a reluctant natural and is only natural cuz her hair kept falling out w the perm. She still ask me if im ever gonna perm my hair again. Lmao what is with haitians and perms???

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    My mom finally gave up perms a couple years ago. Nowadays she either wears a wig (I gave up on that one) or she goes for puff or fro.

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    Ok so i was reading about this in another thread...

    Yup yup yup. Hah....you have the exact same experience as me. I have two male cousins in Canada. I'm sure they got it from their mom and dad when they were in Canda, but their parents got over. It really hit the fan during a funeral. ~sigh~ Haitian family reunions seem to revolve around that. Anyway...we were all together and I seemed to be the loser. That's not to say my mum didn't mention the Jamaican/Inappropriateness of having locs.

    You know for many Haitians....appearance is essential after being a Doctor or Lawyer.

    Quote:I went through more negatively with my parent when I...

    This is interesting. Because my mother was adamantly against relaxers and just didn't like locs---mainly because my dad ABHORED them (he passed away). But she never liked me putting a relaxer in my head. She's like a hot comb is good enough. ^_^

    Oui...that is teh word. As my mummy would say it, "vakabondage".

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    My mom finally gave up perms a couple years ago....

    Ugh...reminds me of an incident with my mum. My mum and dad were both biracial. My mum was born with straight hair--really stick straight. And she's like..."What your problem is, is that you have kinky hair. You see your sister, it's not as kinky so she can do more things. I keep telling you to hot comb and you never do." Then she goes into the story on how I was born with straight hair and had it for a good few years but then I was what do they call it...seh pah "chagrin" mais, it's like when you get cursed by compliments. Like if someone keeps complimenting a child when they're young then something bad happens to the kid in some way. So when I was getting all these compliments apparently for my hair...it turned it "kinky".

    As for a wig...wooh--she thinks those for crazy women. However, she's fully in support of weaves. She's like sometimes you need a bit of fullness.

    Ugh...I dunno. Haitian people and the way they address things are fairly weird when you sit there and diagnose some of the actions and reactions to things.

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    To the person mentioning sisterlocs. I figured it was acceptable because i was closest to looking like you have loose hair. Cause..yeah, my dad did not like me getting braids. But my mum was okay with it. My dad only believed in two things...keep your hair natural OR hot combing done by your mother who would burn your scalp or ear with a scalding hot comb on top of a stove. A relaxer, braids, weaves, and locs are all evil and women should not be doing it.

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    ^^^ the hot comb on the stove! Omg brings back so many memories. Used to be so scared when my mom got to the edges and ears! Hated pressing my hair. Thank God i am locked!

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    I'm Haitian. My family is traditional--older generation. They don't like locs BUT my Uncle has 4 kids and all of them except the daughter have been locked for well over a decade. The daughter will loc also. They took the heat and broke down the prejudice. Now the most I'll get is a side eye. It's a neatness in the traditional sense issue. And the family I'm telling you about are the freeforming, free spirited kind.

    I don't get as much flack because they are accustomed to me going my own way, and know I'm going to do me.

    My mother HATES locks. She used to hate braids too until she saw how fabulous I looked in them. I look really good in my locs---once past this fuzzy stage I know she'll come around. I am seriously grown though and people have enough respect for me not to trip.

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    i'm haitian and my mom didnt like me going natural...

    I've got some relatives that will perm the last 3 strands on their head.

    When going natural--it is to straighten with heat not wear it nappy. Also using an actual comb seems to be a big deal. There's no other legitimate way to detangle. Greasing the scalp...I could go on. I'm considered a trail blazer.

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    This thread, lol. My parents were losing their mind when I locked the first time. My mom was def against it because she thinks a young lady should have hair flowing down their back and locs.don't.count! My dad was fine with it until my mom told him the "bagay" on my head were dreads, smh. He told me I would never find a mate, job, or become anything because of my hair. It was sort of heart breaking because I only go home in the summer and those were the most painful three months of my life.

    My parents are VERY traditional and blamed me when my older sister and three female cousins decided to go natural (been natural all my life). My Haitian friends parents even blame me too when their daughters considered going natural. My aunt specifically tells my cousin "fe wont ou avce bagay cheveux san permanent" and warns her not to become like me. It's confusing. Honestly, after all the tears and headache, I just don't care.

    I'm locing my hair a second time and my parents won't see it till graduation so that will be interesting.

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    I left Haiti a couple years after Duvallier and I remember distinctly that women sporting short TWAs was not an uncommon sight. I so I don't understand where the attitude comes from. My great aunt didn't like it when I wore braids because it made me look African she said. But that not surprising, apparently my great-grandma bestowed her love on her kids, grand-kids and my great-granfather's out of wedlock kids based on hairtype according to my aunt...

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    ^^ That's interesting, maybe it's because they tried to assimilate or fit into American culture which created the mindset. My parents again were very pro -natural. Actually I think there are only about 5 women (in the 20-40 age range) in my family who does not have natural hair and they are adamant against; only one of them is 100% against natural.

    However, natural hair is dominant---with the alternative if you need to go to a family event or something---you must hot comb. I always assumed that every Haitian family had the hot comb (non-electric) for the hair. My sister still follows this method. She's natural and loves it...but when she needs too she pops out the hot comb (electric) and does it herself.

    I'm a bit surprised that your great aunt said that. I wouldn't have thought that would be a problem. Jamaican, yes. African---that's a new one for me. Wow, about the "bestowing of love" Wow. Colourism reaches new heights every time I hear that.

    I really did not expect hair type to be one aspect of colourism in Haiti. That's an interesting dynamic. Because that is profoundly seen in America and Brazil...I've rarely seen it in Haiti.

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    Lmao what is with haitians and perms???...

    Girl I would of never thought seen the wordsnatural &locing and HAITIAN in the same sentence!!

    Yeah when I wore my hair loose like in my siggie my aunt (old school Haitian) tripped the FOOT out!! She's isn't soo much on my case about locs cause I keep it tied up in a mooswhai ( however you spell it )
    But haitians and locs don't seem to get along but that was the case when I first went natural. now I see more haitians opening it up.

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    ^^^ yes haitian and locs didnt seem to go together back in the day. But now i see lots of haitians with locs that have been locked for years. Very nice to see. Think locs are more of an american haitian thing tho. I don't know if ppl in haiti are into it?

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    I really did not expect hair type to be one...

    I had a long winded reply but here's the edited version: in spite of maternal grandma's attitude we are not a colour struck family (for the most part) and our attitudes on hair is a reflection of whatever environment we are in. Unlike my mom, grandma wasn't kind to my naps when I was a kid.

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    She's isn't soo much on my case about locs cause I keep it tied up in a mooswhai ( however you spell it )
    Since I'm guessing you're saying in creole, I'll go with mouchwa.

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    I am Haitian (American born) and even though I am not loced I know EXACTLY what you guys are talking about. The older generation are VERY old school and stuck in their ways. They don't want to see men with braids, or earrings. "Sa se bagay pou me'dam," (that's something for women) and dreadlocks? "Wosh! Sa se bagay vagabon!!" (Whoa! That's something for street thugs)
    I remember when I first brought home an old boyfriend I felt so bad when I made him take off his braids after he put them in like 2 days earlier. He asked me is my mom would say anything about the fro. I told him no because my mom liked fros. But had it been anyone else, "Sa se bagye mal prop" (That's some thing dirty or inproper)
    I have this real REAL old school uncle who is so stuck in his ways it's ridiculous. He's in his 70's and he's been in this country for like over 30 years. But he is still very old school Haitian. I love my Haitian people to death, but y'all know that an old school Haitian is def the worst kind there is. When I came back home from school in 08 it was the first time my fam saw me natural. I remember rocking a fierce twist out puff and every one was giving me compliments left and right. But he was like (in a heavy accent) "When are you going to do something with your hair?" (He meant when are you getting that s**t permed) I gave him this ill speech about how I made the decision to be natural. I don't want to look like a white girl anymore (LOL) and so on. He just stared at me blankly and was like ok so you need money to buy a perm? I'll give $100 to buy some and get it done." I just rolled my eyes and left the room. He gives me grief when I go out the house with a moushwa. He says "what's the matter with you? Ou pakab al deyor konsa! Ou samble bon yo ayiti! Ou samble low class. Moun yo ap panse ou pa geyen kobe" I was like WOW!!! (Saying to me I can't go out side looking like that, I look low class and poor. Like a servant.) When I tried bantu knots I got the same response I look like a "bonne". I'm like whatever. You don't have to love it I do. Just get used to the fact that I'm not perming my hair anymore.
    I think that with native born Haitians they look at themselves as poor and struggling, because of all the bs our country has been through and is going through. They try to be as "American" as possible so they can feel like they are rich. If you are an American born Haitian and don't have a dime to your name, but you go visit Port au Prince and you are wearing Americanized clothing and have that swagg, they might just jump you cuz they figure that since you look American you have money. Same goes with this, having straight hair and pronouncing your Haitian name with an American accent will make you appear like you are better then the "low class." I know this sounds ignorant as hell and I'm sorry if I upset people for speaking my mind but I know this is true. I see it happen everyday, inside and outside of my own family. In Haiti, you look like you have money if you look white American. If you have kinky hair, locs, or even look like you are Haitian, then you are poor and beneath them. But here is the thing that gets me every time, the older Haitian born generation get sooooo mad when their 1st generation children become TOO Americanized. If their kids don't want to learn the language or don't learn how to cook Haitian food then all hell breaks loose. It's like they want us to keep the culture but just not look like it?!?!
    Recently my cousin decided to go natural. She is the daughter of Uncle Old School. The day before yesterday we were laughing (on facebook) about how he is starting to give her grief. Saying "you need to do something about this mess." She also told me how my mother gave her a nice compliment in front of him. My cousin is in her 30's and moved to NY. But when ever she comes in town we are always laughing about how he says something ignorant. By now everyone else in the family accepts us, we are the only one's (so far) in the family who are natural. My mom (she used to be real old school but she has since opened her eyes) is natural but it's under a wig, I try to talk her in to getting locs they would look so nice since she has silver hair, she looks at me "mwen mem sa!" I can't really translate that but it's her saying "hell no." (oh well worth a try) Both my cousin and my mom say that I inspired them to go natural.
    Uncle Old School, say what you want, but I'm an inspiration

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    I am Haitian (American born) and even though I am...

    I totally agree with what you said and I too see it everyday myself.

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    ^^ wyclef!!

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    Or the Boukman Eksperyans crew (though not sure they'd like the organic locs)

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    Quote:
    "mwen mem sa!" I can't really translate that but it's her saying "hell no."
    ROFL! That is EXACTLY what it means XD

    I love this thread. I'm not loc'd but I get the same thing. I usually leave my protective styles in for 2 weeks. After 2 days my twists get fuzzy and after 2 weeks, they might as well be baby locs. (One time I had my twists in for 5 days and complimented a woman on her locs. Her response: "I like yours too!") Every time I wear twists my grandma gets all flustered and says I look like "a rasta."

    The most ridiculous time was when she was in the hospital and she said that her dying wish is for me to get a perm. *rolls eyes* (She wasn't dying.)

    She's getting better though. She is very impressed with my braiding and even asked me to braid her hair!

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    My parents acted like they didnt even know what I was doing with my hair, bc I was natural for so long before I loced..but after a few months that my mom noticed i wasnt taking out my 2 strands she was like "o yea wap byen manae".. Meaning must be nice!! That's the most comment I ever got from her, besides when my cous said she loved my locs my mom quickly stated she was into it, LMAO!!!

    Got to love them, but no issues though!!

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    I remember going to a museum with my mom wearing a messy wash and go. Not only did she not say a word, she absentmindedly picked lint out of my hair while we were waiting for my sister to show up

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    ^^ Yeah, my mummy is getting to that point more and more. Lucky for her I've been investing in hair accessories which she seems to like. She sort of resigned herself to the fact I have locs. Now she's just dealing with the fact that I'm a freeformer. That's a really tough sell for her. I don't blame her actually on this--I transitioned for a year before I went straight into freeforming. She's like, you can have locs but at least make sure they're "neat." She keeps saying.."Ou pah weh moun ap gadeh ou." (You don't know people are looking at you?" Oy. I'm like I don't care. But...as I stated earlier and I"m sure you ladies know...Haitians really really care about appearances.

    I'm really glad there are a lot of us out here.

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    Loving the creole in this thread--LOL! We must all be family--LOL!

    My mom is always offering to comb my hair and telling me to be careful or it will turn into DREADlocks (insert heavy Haitian accent).

    The other day my sister was about to go into a whole speech about how that's the entire point, but I held up my hand and stopped her. What for? In another year I'll be 40 years old.

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